Chartable Fundamentals

This section lists all of the 117 fundamental metrics that are available to chart with a Premium subscription to Stock Rover.

Employees

Unit: Number

The number of direct employees.

Enterprise Value ($M)

Unit: Millions of Dollars

A measure of what the market believes a company’s ongoing operations are worth, also called EV. This is calculated as market cap plus debt, minority interest and preferred shares, minus total cash and cash equivalents.

Market Cap ($M)

Unit: Millions of Dollars

Market capitalization is a measurement of the size of a company, interpreted as the market’s total valuation of the company, obtained by multiplying the number of shares outstanding by the current price per share.

Price

Unit: Dollars

The last trade price of the stock. Depending on the time of day this is either the intraday price or the last close price.

Cash Return

Unit: Percentage

Cash Return tells you how much Free Cash Flow a company generates as a percentage of how much it would cost an investor to buy out the entire business. It is calculated over a trailing twelve month period as the sum of Free Cash Flow and Interest Expense divided by Enterprise Value.

Dividend Yield

Unit: Percentage

The percentage of price per share a company pays out to its shareholders as dividends annually, calculated by dividing the forecasted 12 month dividend payout by the current price.

EV / EBITDA

Unit: Ratio

EV/EBITDA compares the value of a business, free of debt, to earnings before interest. It is calculated as Enterprise Value dividing EBITDA and is useful for comparing valuations regardless of capital structure. Lower EV/EBITDA values indicate less expensive valuation.

Price / Book

Unit: Ratio

Compares a stock’s market value to the value of total assets less total liabilities (book value). This is also known as P/B or PB. A low P/B ratio could mean that the stock is undervalued. However, it could also mean that something is fundamentally wrong with the company.

Price / Cash Flow

Unit: Ratio

Price to Cash Flow Ratio or PCF is an alternative to Price / Earnings. The argument for using cash flow over earnings is that the former is not easily manipulated, while earnings are affected by depreciation and other non-cash factors.

Price / Earnings

Unit: Ratio

A valuation ratio of a company’s current share price compared to its per-share earnings over the past 12 months. This is also known as a stock’s multiple, P/E or PE ratio. In general, a high P/E suggests that investors are expecting higher earnings growth in the future compared to companies with a lower P/E.

Price / Earnings Adjusted

Unit: Ratio

The Price/Earnings ratio adjusted for the net cash (or debt) on the balance sheet, as if all cash were used to buyback stock and all debt were paid by issuing stock.

Price / Free Cash Flow

Unit: Ratio

Price to Free Cash Flow is a valuation metric that compares a company’s market price to its level of annual free cash flow. This is similar to the valuation measure of price-to-cash flow but uses the stricter measure of free cash flow, which reduces operating cash flow by capital expenditures. This is done as companies need to maintain or expand their asset bases (capital expenditure) to either continue growing or maintain the current levels of free cash flow.

Price / Sales

Unit: Ratio

Price to Sales is calculated by dividing a stock’s current price by its revenue per share for the trailing 12 months. This is also known as P/S or PS. It doesn’t take any expenses or debt into account but is particularly useful for comparing stocks with negative earnings.

Price / Tangible Book

Unit: Ratio

Compares a stock’s market value to the value of total assets less total liabilities and intangibles. A low ratio could mean that the stock is undervalued. However, it could also mean that something is fundamentally wrong with the company.

Buyback Yield (Custom)

Unit: Percentage

The net value of share buybacks over the past twelve months as a percent of the current market capitalization. A negative value indicates the company issues more stock than it purchases.

Gross Margin

Unit: Percentage

A company’s total sales revenue minus its cost of goods sold, divided by the total sales revenue, expressed as a percentage. The gross margin represents the percent of total sales revenue that the company retains after incurring the direct costs associated with producing the goods and services sold by a company.

Operating Margin

Unit: Percentage

A company’s operating income as a percent of net sales. This measures a company’s pricing strategy and operating efficiency; the higher the margin, the better.

EBITDA Margin

Unit: Percentage

A company’s total sales revenue minus expenses (excluding interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization), as a percent of sales.

Net Margin

Unit: Percentage

A company’s net income as a percent of sales. The higher the percentage the more money the company earns per dollar of sales.

Gross Profit / Total Assets

Unit: Ratio

Gross Profit divided by Total Assets is a valuation measure used in the Novy-Marx screener and referred to as gross profitability. A high value is purported to have as much power in value based investing as a low price/book ratio.

Return on Assets

Unit: Percentage

A profitability measure calculated as net income as percent of total assets, also called ROA. A high ROA shows an effective allocation of capital.

Return on Equity

Unit: Percentage

A profitability measure calculated as net income as a percent of shareholders equity, also called ROE. A high ROE shows an effective use of investor’s money but it does not account for any risks associated with high Financial Leverage.

ROIC

Unit: Percentage

ROIC, or Return on Invested Capital, quantifies how well a company generates cash flow relative to the capital it has invested in its business. It is defined as Net Income / (Total Equity + Long-term Debt and Capital Lease Obligation + Short-term Debt and Capital Lease Obligation)

Sustainable Growth Rate

Unit: Percentage

The Sustainable Growth Rate attempts to measure how much a firm could grow without borrowing more money. If the firm exceeds this rate of growth, it must borrow funds from another source to facilitate growth. It is calculated by multiplying a company’s Return on Equity by (100 – Payout Ratio Percent).

Cash Flow

Unit: Millions of Dollars

The measure of cash into or out of the company, similar to Net Income but less easily manipulated and without the affects of depreciation and other non-cash charges.

Free Cash Flow as a % of Sales

Unit: Percentage

The trailing 12 month free Cash Flow expenditures as a percent of sales.

Free Cash Flow as a % of Net Income

Unit: Percentage

The trailing 12 month free Cash Flow as a percent of net income.

Cap Ex

Unit: Millions of Dollars

Capital expenditure, or capex is the price of upgrading or buying existing or new long-lived assets.

Cap Ex as a % of Sales

Unit: Percentage

The trailing 12 month capital expenditures as a percent of sales.

Stock Proceeds

Unit: Millions of Dollars

Proceeds from the issuance of stock. Negative values mean the company spent more money buying back stock than it collected from any sales during the period.

Dividends

Unit: Millions of Dollars

The cost of payments made by this company to its common shareholders, preferred shareholders, and Noncontrolling interests.

Payout Ratio

Unit: Percentage

Dividend payout ratio is Dividend Per Share as a percent of Diluted Earnings Per Share and can be used to measure the chance of a dividend increase or cut. For example, a company with a small Payout Ratio has room to increase its dividend.

EPS

Unit: Dollars

Earnings per Share, or EPS is calculated as Net Income divided by the weighted average number of shares.

Cash Per Share

Unit: Dollars

Cash per share is the sum of cash and short-term investments divided by the total number of shares.

Cash Flow Per Share

Unit: Dollars

Cash Flow per Share is a measure of how much cash a company generates. It is calculated over a trailing twelve month period and is arguably less easily manipulated than Earnings per Share because it excludes all noncash items such as depreciation.

Debt Per Share

Unit: Dollars

Debt per share is long term debt divided by the total number of shares.

EPS Diluted

Unit: Dollars

The trailing twelve month Diluted Earnings per Share, or Diluted EPS is calculated as Net Income divided by the diluted average number of shares. The diluted number of shares assumes the exercising of all stock options, warrents and convertible securities. It yields a lower, more conservative EPS value than basic EPS. A big discrepancy between basic EPS and Diluted EPS values can indicate high potential for dilution, not considered to be a good thing.

Dividend Per Share

Unit: Dollars

The dollar amount paid per share in dividends each year.

Equity Per Share

Unit: Dollars

The company’s net worth or book value per share.

Free Cash Flow Per Share

Unit: Dollars

Free Cash Flow per Share is seen as a predictor of future Earnings per Share. It is a calculated over a trailing twelve month period by subtracting Capital Expenditure (Cap Ex) from Cash Flow in order to show how much cash a company generates after paying to maintain and expand its production.

Net Cash Per Share

Unit: Dollars

Net Cash per share is the sum of cash and short-term investments minus long term debt divided by the total number of shares.

Sales Per Share

Unit: Dollars

Sales per share is total company sales over the trailing twelve months divided by the total number of shares.

Tangible Equity Per Share

Unit: Dollars

The company’s total net worth or book value per share minus certain intangible assets that would have little or no value in the event of liquidation.

Operating Income Per Share

Unit: Dollars

Operating Income for the trailing 12-months divided by the current stock price.

Sales

Unit: Millions of Dollars

The total sales (or revenue) over the past 12 months.

Cost of Sales

Unit: Millions of Dollars

The total production costs required for sales of a company, calculated as the cost of the beginning inventory plus the cost of goods purchased minus the ending inventory.

Selling General And Administration

Unit: Millions of Dollars

The aggregate total costs related to selling a firm’s product and services, as well as all other general and administrative expenses. This is sometimes abbreviated as SG&A. Selling expenses are those directly related to the company’s efforts to generate sales (e.g., sales salaries, commissions, advertising, delivery expenses). General and administrative expenses are expenses related to general administration of the company’s operation (e.g., officers and office salaries, office supplies, telephone, accounting and legal services, and business licenses and fees).

Other Income Expense

Unit: Millions of Dollars

Income or expense that comes from miscellaneous sources.

Research

Unit: Millions of Dollars

The amount of money spent on research.

Operating Income

Unit: Millions of Dollars

Earnings before deduction of interest payments and income taxes. Also known as EBIT (earnings before interest and taxes).

Interest Expense

Unit: Millions of Dollars

The cost of interest on debt.

Income Before Tax

Unit: Millions of Dollars

The total income of a company before its income tax is subtracted.

Income After Tax

Unit: Millions of Dollars

The income of a company after its income tax has been paid.

Net Income

Unit: Millions of Dollars

The income or profit of a company after all costs, expenses and taxes have been subtracted from Sales.

Net Income Common Stockholders

Unit: Millions of Dollars

The Net Income available to Common Stockholders is the company’s Net Income minus the amount paid as preferred share dividends.

EBITDA

Unit: Millions of Dollars

Earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortization is essentially net income with these things added back to it. It is used to analyze and compare profitability without the effects of finance and accounting decisions.

Sales Per Employee

Unit: Dollars

The company’s Sales divided by the number of employees

Shares

Unit: Number

The total number of outstanding shares that a company has in millions.

Income Before Extraordinary

Unit: Millions of Dollars

Income after taxes for continuing operations only and before extraordinary or infrequent costs are accounted. Extraordinary items are those that are not standard in a company’s usual expense report, such as lawsuits or natural disasters.

Cash

Unit: Millions of Dollars

The total of cash and short-term investments.

Current Assets

Unit: Millions of Dollars

The assets that could be converted to cash in less than one year. These are assets that can be easily liquidated and are a source of funds for day-to-day operations.

Cash & Short-term %

Unit: Percentage

The sum of cash and short term investments as a percent of total assets.

Receivables

Unit: Millions of Dollars

The value of all payments due to the company for goods sold.

Receivables %

Unit: Percentage

Receivables as a percent of current assets is an efficiency measure, the lower the better.

Inventory

Unit: Millions of Dollars

The estimated value of all unsold inventory.

Inventory %

Unit: Percentage

Inventory as a percent of current assets is an efficiency measure, the lower the better.

Net PPE

Unit: Millions of Dollars

Net PP&E is the sum of assets that are either Property, Plant or Equipment. These assets are usually critical to the company’s operations and not easily liquidated. The value is net of the accumulated depreciation on these assets.

Net PP&E %

Unit: Percentage

The percent of total assets that are either Property, Plant or Equipment. These assets are usually critical to the company’s operations and not easily liquidated.

Intangibles

Unit: Millions of Dollars

The sum of non-monetary assets, such as goodwill, client lists, and brand names.

Intangibles %

Unit: Percentage

Intangibles as a percent of total assets shows how great a portion of the company’s value is in hard-to-value, non-physical assets.

Total Assets

Unit: Millions of Dollars

The sum of current and long-term assets owned by this company.

Total Debt

Unit: Millions of Dollars

Total Debt is the sum of short-term and long-term debt.

Current Liabilities

Unit: Millions of Dollars

The sum of all money owned by a company and due within one year. It is also called payables or current debt.

Long Term Debt

Unit: Millions of Dollars

The sum of all a company’s loans or financial obligations lasting more than one year.

Total Liabilities

Unit: Millions of Dollars

The sum of this company’s liabilities and long-term debt.

Equity

Unit: Millions of Dollars

Total assets minus total liabilities, preferred stock and intangibles (such as goodwill). Equity is commonly used as an indicator of the company’s net worth or book value.

Tangible Equity

Unit: Millions of Dollars

The company’s total net worth or book value minus certain intangible assets that would have little or no value in the event of liquidation.

Days Inventory

Unit: Number

An efficiency measure estimating how many days it might take to sell the current inventory. This is effectively the number of days an item is held as inventory before it is sold.

Days Sales Outstanding

Unit: Number

An efficiency measure showing the average number of days to collect revenue after a sale has been made.

Debt / Equity

Unit: Ratio

Debt/Equity is sometimes called D/E, Financial Leverage, or Gearing and it is the ratio of Total Debt to Equity. A high ratio indicates a risky business and a low ratio makes a buyout more likely.

Interest Coverage

Unit: Ratio

Interest Coverage calculates a company’s ability to make payments on debt. It is computed as earnings before interest and taxes divided by interest expense.

Long Term Debt / Total Capital

Unit: Ratio

This variation of the traditional Debt / Equity Ratio computes the proportion of a company’s long term debt divided by its available capital. Capital includes both equity and debt.

Current Ratio

Unit: Ratio

A measures of the company’s ability to pay short-term obligations, calculated as current assets divided by current liabilities. As a rule of thumb, safe investments have a current ratio above 2.

Quick Ratio

Unit: Ratio

Quick ratio is also called acid-test or liquid ratio and it measures a company’s ability to meet its short-term obligations with its most liquid assets. It is calculated as (Current Assets – Inventory) / Current Liabilities. As a rule of thumb, safe investments have a quick ratio above 1.

Book Yield

Unit: Percentage

Book value, or Equity, for the recentmost quarterly report divided by the current stock price. This is the inverse of the Price to Book (PB or P/B) value.

Cash Flow Yield

Unit: Percentage

Cash Flow per share for the trailing 12-months divided by the current stock price. This is the inverse of the the Price to Cash Flow (PCF) value.

Earnings Yield

Unit: Percentage

The earnings per share for the most recent 12-month period divided by the current market price per share. This is the inverse of the Price to Earnings (PE or P/E ratio).

Free Cash Flow Yield

Unit: Percentage

Free Cash Flow per share for the trailing 12-months divided by the current stock price. This is the inverse of the Price to Free Cash Flow (PFCF) value.

Sales Yield

Unit: Percentage

Sales per share for the trailing 12 months divided by the current stock price. This is the inverse of the Price to Sales (PS) value.

Tangible Book Yield

Unit: Percentage

Tangible Book value per share from the recentmost quarterly report divided by the current stock price. This is the inverse of the Price to Tangible Book value.

EBITDA Margin vs Industry

Unit: Percentage

The company’s EBITDA margin minus the average of its industry.

Gross Margin vs Industry

Unit: Percentage

The company’s gross margin minus the average of its industry.

Net Margin vs Industry

Unit: Percentage

The company’s net margin minus the average of its industry.

Operating Margin vs Industry

Unit: Percentage

The company’s operating margin minus the average of its industry.

Return on Assets vs Industry

Unit: Percentage

The company’s return on assets minus the average of its industry.

Return on Equity vs Industry

Unit: Percentage

The company’s return on equity minus the average of its industry.

Return on Assets vs Sector

Unit: Percentage

The company’s return on assets minus that of its sector.

Return on Equity vs Sector

Unit: Percentage

The company’s return on equity minus that of its sector.

Dividend Yield Industry Decile

Unit: Number

The decile rank of the company’s Dividend Yield among all companies in the same industry. Companies with the highest yields score a 1 and the lowest yielding companies score a 10.

Financial Safety Industry Decile

Unit: Number

The 1-10 rank of a company’s financial safety versus that of its industry peers. Companies with the lowest Financial Leverage and lowest Debt to Equity Ratio will score a 1.

Growth Industry Decile

Unit: Number

The 1-10 rank of a company’s 3 year revenue growth versus that of its industry peers. Companies with the most growth will have a rank of 1.

Price / Book Industry Decile

Unit: Number

The decile rank of the company’s Price/Book ratio among the Price/Book ratio of all companies in the same industry. Companies that are cheapest by this valuation measure score a 1 and the most expensively ranked companies score a 10.

Price / Cash Flow Industry Decile

Unit: Number

The decile rank of the company’s Price/Cash Flow ratio among the Price/Cash Flow ratio of all companies in the same industry. Companies that are cheapest by this valuation measure score a 1 and the most expensively ranked companies score a 10.

Price / Earnings Industry Decile

Unit: Number

The decile rank of the company’s Price/Earnings ratio among the Price/Earnings ratio of all companies in the same industry. Companies that are cheapest by this valuation measure score a 1 and the most expensively ranked companies score a 10.

Price / Free Cash Flow Industry Decile

Unit: Number

The decile rank of the company’s Price/Free Cash Flow ratio among the Price/Free Cash Flow ratio of all companies in the same industry. Companies that are cheapest by this valuation measure score a 1 and the most expensively ranked companies score a 10.

Price / Sales Industry Decile

Unit: Number

The decile rank of the company’s Price/Sales ratio among the Price/Sales ratio of all companies in the same industry. Companies that are cheapest by this valuation measure score a 1 and the most expensively ranked companies score a 10.

Profitability Industry Decile

Unit: Number

The 1-10 rank of a company’s profitability versus that of its industry peers. Companies with the highest Return on Assets and Return on Equity values will have a rank of 1.

Dividend Yield Sector Decile

Unit: Number

The decile rank of the company’s Dividend Yield among the yields of all companies in the same sector. Companies that have the highest yields score a 1 and the lowest yielding companies score a 10.

Financial Safety Sector Decile

Unit: Number

The 1-10 rank of a company’s financial safety versus that of its sector peers. Companies with the lowest Financial Leverage and lowest Debt to Equity Ratio will score a 1.

Growth Sector Decile

Unit: Number

The 1-10 rank of a company’s 3 year revenue growth versus that of its sector peers. Companies with the most growth will have a rank of 1.

Price / Book Sector Decile

Unit: Number

The decile rank of the company’s Price/Book ratio among the Price/Book ratio of all companies in the same sector. Companies that are cheapest by this valuation measure score a 1 and the most expensively ranked companies score a 10.

Price / Cash Flow Sector Decile

Unit: Number

The decile rank of the company’s Price/Cash Flow ratio among the Price/Cash Flow ratio of all companies in the same sector. Companies that are cheapest by this valuation measure score a 1 and the most expensively ranked companies score a 10.

Price / Earnings Sector Decile

Unit: Number

The decile rank of the company’s Price/Earnings ratio among the Price/Earnings ratio of all companies in the same sector. Companies that are cheapest by this valuation measure score a 1 and the most expensively ranked companies score a 10.

Price / Free Cash Flow Sector Decile

Unit: Number

The decile rank of the company’s Price/Free Cash Flow ratio among the Price/Cash Flow ratio of all companies in the same sector. Companies that are cheapest by this valuation measure score a 1 and the most expensively ranked companies score a 10.

Price / Sales Sector Decile

Unit: Number

The decile rank of the company’s Price/Sales ratio among the Price/Sales ratio of all companies in the same sector. Companies that are cheapest by this valuation measure score a 1 and the most expensively ranked companies score a 10.

Profitability Sector Decile

Unit: Number

The 1-10 rank of a company’s profitability versus that of its sector peers. Companies with the highest Return on Assets and Return on Equity values will have a rank of 1.